20.2 C
Nigeria
Saturday, January 29, 2022

NEH awards four fellowships, digital scholarship grant to Arts and Letters, Keough School faculty | News | Notre Dame News

[adace-ad id="2627"]
Main Building (Photo by Barbara Johnston/University of Notre Dame)

Three faculty members in the University of Notre Dame’s Faculty of Arts and Letters and one in the Keio School of Global Affairs have won National Endowment Scholarships for the Humanities, expanding the university’s record success with a federal agency committed to supporting original research and scholarship.

Sarah Bernstein
Sarah Bernstein

Sarah Bernstein, Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy. Taryn Chun, Assistant Professor in the Department of Film, Television, and Theater; Katie Jarvis, Karl E. Koch Associate Professor in the Department of History; Sharon Yoon, assistant professor of Korean studies, is among the students colleagues announced by NEH this week. Notre Dame has also received a large grant for a digital grant project led by Robert Golding, Director of the Riley Center for Science, Technology and Values, in partnership with the Navarre Family Center for Digital Grants and its director, Scott Weingart, as well as collaborators at Oxford University’s Bodleian Library.

Since 2000, the College of Letters and Arts has received more fellowships from NEH than any other private university in the country. NEH Fellowships are competitive awards awarded to scholars who pursue projects that exemplify exceptional research, rigorous analysis, and clear writing.

[adace-ad id="2627"]

Bernstein, also a member of the Gender Studies Program, will explore the metaphysics of intersectionality – the idea that different forms of social oppression interact and intersect in ways greater than the sum of their components. She said the metaphysics of social groups is key to helping anyone understand how different factors or circumstances have shaped their identity.

taren chun
taren chun

“For example: How would you be a different person if you had biological sex different from you? This is, in many ways, a metaphysical question about what you hold constant and what differs in the worlds in which you are different,” Bernstein said.

Chun, who studies Chinese theater and visual culture, will investigate the links between aesthetics and technology for her project, “Spectacle and Excess in Global Chinese Performance.”

Since the opening ceremony of the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics, large-scale multimedia theater has become a prominent type of performance in China and throughout the Chinese-speaking world.

[adace-ad id="2627"]

Chun said, who holds simultaneous appointment in Department of East Asian Languages ​​and Cultures He is a faculty member in Liu Institute of Asian and Asian Studies. “We are at a time when theater artists around the world are grappling with how to sustain live performance in a digital world and under continuous epidemiological conditions.”

Katie Jarvis
Katie Jarvis

Jarvis, a historian of early and late modern France, will spend her fellowship writing her book The Democratization of Forgiveness in Revolutionary France, 1789-1799, which examines how ordinary citizens have shaped modern politics and society through the reinvention of reconciliation. It explores how revolutionaries, having wrested the power of pardon from the king and the church, have reformulated collective forgiveness and turned political overtones into routine. Citizen relations.

Jarvis, who is also a faculty fellow at the Nanovich Institute for European Studies and the Kellogg Institute of International Studies and associate faculty in the Gender Studies Program, explained that people “fix broken bonds by arbitrating domestic disputes, foregoing personal loans and settling debts in court.” They reconceptualized reconciliation through rites of the sacraments, innovative religious cults, and education of young people.”

Sharon Young
Sharon Young

Through a grant through NEH’s New Directions Program for Digital Grant in Cultural Institutions, scholars at Notre Dame and Oxford will develop a new platform that makes it easier to analyze, view, and reuse digital archives. Golding, who is also associate professor in the Liberal Studies program and director of the doctoral program in History and Philosophy of Science, will lead the development of the proof-of-concept for an Interoperable Script Framework (ITF) — a loose term for an object. Agreements and contracts that define how data and associated metadata are formatted so that it can be used by several different platforms. The team plans to develop an accessible, enhanced platform capable of hosting images along with text versions and complex graphs using contemporary navigation and annotation tools.

To test the platform, the team will upgrade an old digital project – “The Thomas Harriot Manuscripts (1560-1621)”, which Golding co-edited – that exemplifies the challenges the ITF may face in its development and the types and scale of problems it will solve.

Yoon, also affiliated with the Keough School’s Leo Institute of Asian and Asian Studies, has received a fellowship from the NEH and the Japan-American Friendship Committee to research anti-racist movements supporting Korean minorities living in Japan.

Robert Golding
Robert Golding
[adace-ad id="2627"]

For her project, “Social Media Activism and Combating Hate in Koreatown, Osaka,” Yoon will analyze how social networking sites have opened up new avenues for civic engagement in Japan. In particular, it will investigate how physical environments such as Korean enclaves shape the ways activists share information and resources to effect legislative change. 3rd and 4th generation Korean activists, known as the Korean Zenichi, led a counter-movement to stop the far-right hate rallies targeting Korean communities between 2013 and 2015. Lawyers and ordinary Japanese citizens, counter-activists were able to pressure local politicians to implement the first anti-hate speech decree in Osaka, and later, a national anti-hate speech bill in 2016.

“I want to understand how a group of disadvantaged minorities was able to achieve such concrete legislative action so quickly,” Yoon said. Korean Zenichi represent just over 1 percent of Japan’s population, and are descendants of migrant workers who once worked under slavery-like conditions, in some cases continuing to occupy the lowest rungs of society.

[adace-ad id="2627"]

Related Articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Stay Connected

22,878FansLike
3,144FollowersFollow
19,100SubscribersSubscribe

Latest Articles

Zionpay